Tag Archive: white wine


Ladies Luncheon

farmers-market-nancy-pahlNo but really, how long has it been? Too long. The days stretch into weeks and while Summer zips by I find myself enjoying it often enough away from the kitchen X) It’s no surprise (or excuse for not posting, that’s my fault entirely:( ) but it does leave more time for strolling, shopping, and exploring. Grocery shopping is among the best parts of Summer. I still can’t seem to understand how everyone ends up hating grocery shopping so much. I mean, it’s still shopping…right? And while it may be crowded, bright, and dirty at least there’s fresh food to be found there…better than hunting and foraging for our food I like to think πŸ˜€ So, why do I like grocery shopping so much? Well, I don’t have a good reason, just that it is a reason. I don’t mind navigating the tight & narrow aisles for unique and tasty treasures. I rather enjoy the process of finding, comparing, and deciding on things to buy and eventually, devour πŸ˜‰ Most of the time (and probably to the annoyed dismay of others) I end up taking my time, getting lost, and often standing in the way of the bustling shoppers as I try to decide what “light” coconut milk means in the Asian aisle. Sure it’s depressing because you can’t buy everything in front of you πŸ˜‰ (and because, oh yeah you have to carry it all home on your back), but that’s not the point. I used to like shopping a whole of a lot less simply because (a) it had become a chore; and (b) it required strict budgeting. But ah, such is life.

I always have a list (“the list”) when I go grocery shopping because it keeps me on track, what I’ve discovered is that it’s important to plan (and yes, budget) some spontaneity into the task of shopping. What do I mean? I allot my spontaneity a certain amount on my weekly grocery list so that while I still get all those things needed for making meals, there’s also room for something random, or daring, or sugar-coated – whatever I may or may not stumble across. Believe me, it has a tendency to be surprising πŸ˜‰ Sometimes it’s dried fruit or other snacks for my toddler (my first thought “oh thank god, something new. Let’s see if he likes this“), other times it’s a block on cheese that was on sale, or caramelized almonds, or a basket of cherries . Whatever “tickles your fancy” while your out & about on the drudgery of adult life and modern food-gathering is worth your notice and consideration – just be aware that: 1. you do and will always have to shop for food, right? Because 2. you have to eat and eat healthy, and 3. that it’s hugely important and necessary. It is okay to try and enjoy the uncertainty and variety that comes with the modern and the everyday. Sometimes it’s focusing on how little you have to go out and get that makes you overlook the facSnyders_Frans_Fish_Markett that it requires so little to feed and please your family and yourself πŸ™‚ That being said, it’s nice to give voice to my secret delight at the present food-gathering process, hope I don’t upset the haters. I try to appreciate and believe me, that doesn’t always come easy but there are the finer things in life and shopping for food I consider to be one of them.

To pick up at my point, an example would be this luncheon that I prepared for a friend, which necessitated me visiting 3 different stores to properly acquire all the “necessary” ingredients, and even then there were some substitutions. The original recipe was from a “Fresh & Quick” edition of Fine Cooking. Some things just feel special when you go out and get them – fresh seafood (i.e. scallops) included. I remember when I first saw the slippery suckers πŸ˜‰ I thought: …what even are those? Delicious is what they are. I liked the simplicity of this recipe and was only slightly daunted by the sheer amount of steps in completing the “quick & easy” -ness of it all. Note to self for next time: double the amount of scallops you make because seriously, it won’t be enough…

Before I jump into this recipe, I want to say that the star ingredient would be truly, simply – butter. Where would seared scallops be without Butter-Meltingbutter? I’ll tell you: a little dry and not nearly salty enough. Butter plays a key role in this recipe and is essential for plenty of other amazingly delicious things that only exist because of it (like biscuits, and frosting!) I’ll give credit where credit’s due – butter is the best, and I thank it for existing. I’ve come across a recipe for using aΒ Lemon-Dill beurre blanc sauce to spoon over steamed clams with crusty bread. Mmm…more butter may be needed πŸ˜€

 

Seared Sea Scallops with White-Wine Pea Puree, Peppered Bacon, and Lemony Gremolata

Ingredientsscallops

(for the scallops)

6 – 8 fresh or defrosted jumbo scallops

1 package of bacon, coarsely chopped

2 Tbs. butter

(for the puree)

1 package of frozen peas, defrosted

6 shallots, peeled & coarsely chopped

3 garlic cloves, peeled & chopped

3 Tbs. butterFood52

5 Tbs. white wine

5 Tbs. chicken broth

4 Tbs. milk or cream

(for the gremolata))

1 lemon

1 bunch of fresh parsley, stemmed & chopped

1 shallot, peeled & minced

sea salt & cracked peppergremolata

(1) Rinse the scallops under cold water and pat dry, season with salt & pepper and chill until it’s time to cook. (2) To make the puree, melt 3 Tbs. butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add shallots and garlic and let cook until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the peas, chicken broth, and white wine and let cook uncovered until the mixture is soft & fragrant, about 5 more minutes. Remove from heat and let cool briefly, 5 minutes. (3) Transfer the pea mixture to a blender and blend until smooth, adding the milk or cream and seasoning to taste with salt & pepper. Once pureed, return to the saucepan, cover, and keep warm over very low heat until ready to serve. (4) Heat a a medium skillet or frying pan on medium high-heat. When hot, add bacon pieces and cook, stirring occasionally until bacon is brown and crunchy, 5 – 6 minutes total. Transfer to a plate lined with paper-towels, season with cracked pepper, and cover until ready to serve. (5) Wipe the skillet clean before returning to medium-high heat. Melt 2 Tbs. of butter. When piping hot, add the scallops and do not stir. Let sear 3 minutes per side, turning carefully to brown the bottom & top sides of scallops until they are firm to the touch. Transfer cooked scallops to a plate and cover with foil. (6) In a small bowl, combine the minced shallot and fresh parsley. Zest the lemon and then juice it, adding it to the mixture and stir until combined. Season generously with salt & pepper, adding more lemon juice, if needed. (7) When ready to serve, scoop a spoonful of puree onto each plate, season with peppered bacon, and set seared scallops in the puree. Garnish with spoonfuls of the lemony gremolata. Goes great when paired with either/or garlic bread and champagne πŸ™‚

Serves 2 – wish it made more, double it if you plan on being really hungry

Phew! That was a lot of steps but trust me, it’s worth it. These days as the rain (and wind…and hail…) begins to pop up during the week, I find the salty, fresh air contributing to my recent craving for seafood. My next seafood cooking extravaganza is going to be mussels in Riesling lemon broth with – yes – more garlic bread. I’ll have to make a “luncheon” out of that because what is a good dish without good company? Hope the rest of July provscallop-shellses to be as thrilling as scallops for lunch πŸ˜›

My question: What was served with the last plate of scallops you ate?

I ask this because the combinations of pairings with scallops kind of blows my minds sometimes and you never know what will be the perfect side – like a chickpea puree or roasted hazelnuts, or even brown “nori butter” like I read in a Bon Appetit from earlier this year. I will make more scallops this month just to satisfy my new fondness of searing things grill-style in our kitchen’s new skillet. Scallops are a somewhat of a blank canvas and I’d like to make a different version before I get tired of seeing them on the dinner menu πŸ˜‰

7.13.2014

Advertisements

corn_poster_ThanksgivingHappy Thanksgiving! Wait, did I miss it?! It’s been a little while since my last post so I thought I’d do something fantastical, something fresh and flavorful in this frigid month of November. Entrer: the roasted chicken.

Chicken, you say — what about Turkey? Don’t get me wrong, I LOVE, miss, dream about turkey, but a cook should not underestimate the goodness & divine simplicity of a roasted chicken. My reasons? First of all, it’s cheap, ahem–cheaper. Secondly, it’s smaller. I WISH I had the time, a big enough oven, and actual guests to make a 20 pound turkey, but I don’t πŸ˜€ Third, a chicken cooks much faster because yeah, it’s smaller, and I can’t even begin to point out the delicious possibilities that emerge with all that the leftover chicken. Roasted/rotisserie chicken makes the best sandwiches…assuming there are leftovers. After mulling over my Thanksgiving plans I decided yes, a roasted chicken is just what was needed for our little celebration.

My secret ingredient? The dry rub. Okay, so this is like 6 ingredients, but it’s pure magic. I saw this particular dry rub recipe in this month’s Bon Appetit (see the photo below, that’s what caught my attention FIRST). It’s probably one of the more colorful rubs I’ve ever seen (thank you pink peppercorns) — and emphasis on easy! One of my favorite spices in the world is coriander so any recipe that uses coriander seeds tends to seize One-Hour-Roasted-Chickenme by the taste buds πŸ˜› It takes only 7 hours to cure a chicken covered in dry rub (vs. 2-3 days to brine one), so I was sold from the start. The apartment still smells like roasting peppercorns and oranges..

Since posting just one Thanksgiving recipe seems absurd, I posted the menu that I ended up making on our rainy, foggy evening. It includes a tomato-basil risotto that has corn, white wine, and lots of garlic & onions. Mmm, so glad I found another excuse to make risotto! This risotto recipe is from Fine Cooking; coming across it, I initially thought “wow, all my favorite ingredients in one risotto recipe..” I took it as a sign πŸ™‚

Peppered Citrus Dry Rub

IngredientsPink_Peppercorns

1 whole chicken (or turkey, or duck..)

2 Tbs. black peppercorns

2 Tbs. pink peppercorns

2 Tbs. coriander seeds

1 tsp. white peppercorns

6 bay leaves

3 lemons, zested

1 orange, zesteddry-brine

1 dl (or 1/4 cup) coarse sea salt

2 Tbs. brown sugar

cooking twine

foil

(1) In a small saucepan, combine all of the peppercorns, coriander, and bay leaves. Toast on medium heat until fragrant, less than 5 minutes. Remove from heat & let cool. Put these spices in a spice grinder or blender (…or a plastic bag that you seal & beat with a rolling pin:-)) and grind until the peppercorns & seeds are coarsely broken up. Add the salt, lemon & orange zest, and brown sugar; mix. Tada! Dry rub. (2) Wash the bird and dry with paper towels. Place with the breast facing up on a large plate or dish. Cross & tie the legs together with kitchen twine. When the bird is dry, massage the dry rub into the skin and everywhere else it sticks until you’ve used all of the dry rub. Chill the chicken, uncovered in the fridge to brine, approx. 6 hours. (3) Preheat oven to 220 degrees Celsius (430 degrees Fahrenheit). Remove the chicken from fridge and drain any liquid. Rinse off the dry rub and pat dry. Transfer to an oven pan lined with foil and put on the top rack in oven. Let the skin crisp 10-15 minutes. (4) Turn the heat down to 180 degrees Celsius (360 degrees Fahrenheit) and cook the bird about 20 minutes per pound of poultry (or 1/2 kg). (5) Remove bird from oven and loosely cover with foil. Check temperature with a meat thermometer in the thickest part of the thigh, should register at least 85 degrees Celsius (185 degrees Fahrenheit). Let sit 10 minutes before carving. Serve sliced or in pieces with warm buttered rolls.

Serves 4

Tomato-Basil Risotto with White Wine, Sweet Corn, & Garlic

Ingredientsbasil

2 cups arborio rice

2 onions, peeled & chopped

7 garlic cloves, peeled & chopped

5-6 cups broth or reconstituted bullion

4 tomatoes, chopped

1 cup white wine (like chardonnay)

1 bunch of fresh Basil, chopped

1/2 cup (just over 1 dl) of shredded cheese, pref. Parmesan

3 Tbs. butterrisotto cooking

olive oil

sea salt

cracked pepper

(1) In a large pot, melt the butter over medium heat. When hot, add onions & garlic; let cook, stirring, until translucent, about 10 minutes. In a separate bowl, mix together tomatoes, basil, and 2 Tbs. olive oil. Set aside. (2) Add the rice to the pot and, stirring often, let it crisp slightly. Next add the wine and corn and cook until liquid has absorbed. (3) Continue cooking the risotto over medium heat, adding broth 1/2 cup at a time, and stirring often to prevent sticking, until liquid absorbs. This means you should be adding more wine/broth to the pot every 5-7 minutes or so. (4) Taste test the risotto after you’ve used up all the broth; cooked risotto rice should have slight texture to bite, but not be crunchy. (5) Add the tomato basil mixture and turn off heat. Let the risotto stand covered 3-4 minutes. Fold in the shredded cheese, season with salt and pepper, and serve.

Serves 4

chicken_horrorI know risotto is not the traditional dish to serve during this delicious holiday, but it beats trying to concoct stuffing without breadcrumbs, pecans, or cranberries 😦 My next post will be on the lighter side of things as I travel to Indonesia and get to try Bali cuisine. I have a feeling it’s going to blow my mind.. πŸ˜€

My question: What is one (non traditional) dish you’ve made for Thanksgiving and really loved?

11.29.13

Mussels 4 Ways

musselsAhh, mussels. It’s hard to describe precisely why I like these crusty, salty bivalves. Once in a while I get a little piece of shell as I’m eating, and I think to myself: why do I do this? Simply speaking: mussels are delicious. Labor-intensive, yes. Delicate and high maintenance, a little. Dirty and fishy, often enough. So what’s the big deal? Again, mussels are delicious – and good for you to boot. Plus, making mussels (avec le bouillon) is an art form that I have a lot of respect for – the art of broth-making.

There’s something salivating about a big pot of mussels on the table, filled with dark shells submerged in a broth that smells something of butter and wine. Furthermore, mussels are one of those magical foods that become heavenly when cooked with/in alcohol. The catch? You have to take care when making them, or at least pay some attention. I used to buy the poor creatures alive, keep them padded with damp paper towels in my fridge for 24 hours while I got my act together to go ahead and steam them for dinner. A quarter of the little guys would die as I was trying to de-beard them between the sink and the hot stove. I’ll agree, that’s way to much work… My solution? The seafood section at the grocery store is huge, have you checked it out? There’s all sorts of stuff there, including — mussels, in the shell, beautiful and ready to go. I buy a huge, flash-frozen batch for around $9.00 and keep it in the freezer until I’m ready. The best part? No defrosting, you get to concentrate on the broth and as soon as that’s ready you crank up the heat, add frozen mussels, and five minutes later (less, really) you’re ready to dig in.

strained-mussels-judy-mercer

Mussels seem like a poor man’s food but when you’re eating the poached and pinkened sea creatures between pieces of a baguette and some roasted garlic, it’s close to heaven πŸ˜‰ My advice is to make mussels in any form — and experiment a little with your favorite seafood spices and sauces. Get the mussels frozen and save them in your freezer for a rainy day. I’ve been playing around with mussel recipes and these particular 4 I made up from looking over the various versions in existence (and my own taste and favorite ingredients). Belonions1ow are what I think are the best ways to serve these sweet & salty little things. As always, when making a big pot of mussels, remember to serve them in bowls with big spoons; and other than the mussels + steaming broth, all you really need is a lot of bread and, oh yeah, napkins.

My star ingredient? The onion family. In every one of these mussel recipes, one of the onion family is used; and thank god it’s a big family. Cooking the onions/garlic is how this dish begins and the finished product would not taste the same without this aromatic group of ingredients. The super hero ingredient? Vegetable bullion allows you to make broth with some hot water in seconds, and it can sit in your spice drawer until needed for months. Just be aware it packs a salty taste. But broth is what makes mussels such a sensational dish, so be sure NOT to water down the both any more than is needed, or maybe just water it down with wine instead πŸ˜€

Mussels – 4 Ways (!)

(1) American – Beer Mussels with Bacon, Red Beans, Roasted Garlic, & Fresh Thyme

2 lbs. frozen musselsbeer_mussels

Broth: 1 bottle (light) beer, 5 pieces of bacon, 5 shallots (sliced), 3 Tbs. butter, 3 cups vegetable broth, 1 can kidney beans (drained & rinsed),

Season with: fresh Thyme (minced)

Serve with: whole wheat baguette (sliced), 4 heads of garlic (roasted), & aged Parmesan (shredded)

(1) To roast garlic: preheat the oven to 190 degrees Celsius (375 Fahrenheit). Cut the top off 4 heads of garlic with a serrated knife. Season lightly with oil, salt, & pepper and wrap OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAtightly in foil. Bake for 60-65 minutes until cloves are golden and sweet. Let cool and remove from foil before serving. (2) Melt butter in a large pot over medium-high heat. When hot, add shallots and cook about 3-4 minutes, stirring occasionally. (3) Add bacon sliced and cook until fat had rendered and the pieces have browned slightly, 4-5 minutes more. Remove bacon from pot and chop (or chop in the pot with a pair of scissors). (4) Return bacon to the pot. Add broth, beans, and a Tablespoon of fresh Thyme. Bring the mixture to a boil and then lower the heat; simmer, covered until reduced by 1/3, 10-15 minutes. (5) Return heat to high and add frozen mussels and beer. Cook covered, stirring occasionally until mussels are pink and fragrant, 5 -6 minutes. (6) Season the broth to taste with salt, pepper, and fresh Thyme. Serve immediately in bowls accompanied by bread, roasted garlic, & cheese.

Serves 4

(2) Asian – Spicy Mussels with Saki, Thai Chilies, Mushrooms, & Sesame Seeds

2 lbs. frozen musselsmussels_asian

Broth: 1 cup saki, 1 bunch green onions (sliced), 3 Tbs. butter, 2 cups mushrooms (sliced), 1 small can bamboo shoots (drained & rinsed), 1 small can water chestnuts (drained, rinsed, & sliced), 3 cups vegetable broth, 2 Thai chilies (sliced), 1 piece fresh ginger (peeled & sliced), 1/2 Tbs. soy sauce.

Season with: sesame seeds (toasted) & chili flakes

Serve with: garlic bread or steamed rice

(1) Melt butter in a large pot over medium-high heat. When hot, add green onions and cook about 3-4 minutes, stirring occasionally. (2) Add mushrooms and 1/2 Tbs. sesame seeds, stirring occasionally until slightly browned.Β  (3) Add ginger, bamboo shoots, chili-flakesand Thai chilies, stirring often until fragrant, another 5-6 minutes. (4) Add the broth, soy sauce, and water chestnuts. Bring the mixture to a boil and then lower the heat; simmer, covered until reduced by 1/3, 10-15 minutes. (5) Return heat to high and add frozen mussels and saki. Cook covered, stirring occasionally until mussels are pink and fragrant, 5 -6 minutes. (6) Season the broth to taste with salt, chili flakes, and sesame seeds. Serve immediately in bowls accompanied by rice and/or bread.

Serves 4

(3) French – Provencal Mussels with White Wine, White Beans, Dill, & Fresh Tomatoes

2 lbs. frozen musselsMUSSELS-PROVENCAL

Broth: 1 cup white wine, 2 red onions (sliced), 3 Tbs. butter, 2 tomatoes (chopped), 1 can white beans (drained & rinsed), 1 celery stalk (sliced), 3 cups vegetable broth, 1 can artichoke hearts (drained, rinsed & chopped), 1 Tbs. dried Dill, 2 garlic cloves (sliced).

Season with: sea salt, cracked pepper, & lemon juice

Serve with: buttered bread & dollops of Greek yogurtwhite_beans

(1) Melt butter in a large pot over medium-high heat. When hot, add red onions, celery, and garlic. Cook about 3-4 minutes until softened, stirring occasionally. (2)Β  Add tomato, dried dill, and artichoke hearts, stirring often until fragrant, another 5 minutes. (4) Add the broth, and white beans. Bring the mixture to a boil and then lower the heat; simmer, covered until reduced by 1/3, 10-15 minutes. (5) Return heat to high and add frozen mussels and white wine. Cook covered, stirring occasionally until mussels are pink and fragrant, 5 -6 minutes. (6) Season the broth to taste with salt, pepper, and lemon juice. Serve immediately accompanied with buttered bread & dollops of Greek yogurt πŸ™‚

Serves 4

(4) Indian – Curry Mussels with Chickpeas, Red Wine, Leeks, & Cashews

2 lbs. frozen musselsCurry-Mussels

Broth: 1 cup red wine (sub Indian beer), 1 bunch leeks (washed & sliced), 3 Tbs. butter, 2 celery stalks (chopped), 2 carrots (peeled & chopped), 3 Tbs. curry powder (any), 1 can chickpeas (drained & rinsed), 3 cups vegetable broth, 1/2 cup cashews (salted), 1/2 cup milk (or cream), 3 garlic cloves (sliced).

Season with: roasted paprika & fresh cilantro (minced)

Serve with: garlic naan & seared veggies

(1) Melt butter in a large pot over medium-high heat. When hot, add leeks, celery, carrot, OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAand garlic. Cook about 10-12 minutes until softened, stirring occasionally. (2)Β  Add cashews, curry powder, and chickpeas, stirring often until fragrant, another 5 minutes. (4) Add the broth and bring the mixture to a boil and then lower the heat; simmer, covered until reduced by 1/3, 10-15 minutes. (5) Return heat to high and add frozen mussels and red wine. Cook covered, stirring occasionally until mussels are pink and fragrant, 5 -6 minutes. (6) Season the broth to taste with milk (adding more if needed), salt, roasted paprika, and fresh cilantro. Serve immediately accompanied with buttered naan or seared veggies of your choice.

Serves 4

painting_musselMy “trick,” if you will, is that I only add the wine/saki/beer to the pot of broth when I throw the mussels in, that way the little critters basically poach in alcohol, versus it just burning off in all the boiling… Steaming hot and wreaking of herbs and butter, it’s hard not to get a little messy devouring dishes like these πŸ˜›

My question: what is your all-time favorite seafood dish to eat ? – something you wouldn’t make for yourself, but might treat yourself to? Mine would still have to be lobster tail, mmm… πŸ™‚

9.4.13

Pre-Spring Revelry: Crab + Pasta

I know, two seafood posts in a row-I must be living closer to the ocean, right? Yes. Turns out this yummy genre of salty creatures are a pretty easy way to add protein to any meal I end up making. I’ve found all sorts of seafood treats dwell in the pasta_eaterfrozen section too, de-finned, de-veined, de-shelled, ready to cook and eat. And unlike some other meat, anything from shrimp to fish steaks cook through in maybe 3 or 4 minutes. And the (other) good thing about buying frozen seafood? Other than the cheaper part πŸ™‚ Food-borne illness and other nastiness like parasites can’t survive frost. So you can be assured it will not make you sick, which is nice to skip worrying about entirely. The main plus for me, being so proximately close to the source of all this seaness now, is the quality which is much improved…maybe everything is just better in KΓΈbenhavn πŸ˜€

I first came across this recipe way back when I still had my Tyler’s Ultimate cookbook. My initial impression after tasting (back when I didn’t like seafood all that much) was so wonderful that I remembered where I’d seen this recipe and looked it back up for this occasion. It’s always nice to make dishes you already know will taste amazing. Using frozen crab meat makes preparation super easy. I bought frozen leg/arms meat, already shelled so all you have to do is defrost and cook in some bubbling sauce (or wine:)) for three minutes or so before tossing with pasta. If you’re averse to using fresh Mint, I encourage you to make an exception with this dish, the herb compliments the crab so wonderfully you barely notice it’s “mintiness.” I managed to see some reviews of this recipe in my quest to find it online and I have to say, there were some serious crab-pasta haters 😦 Honestly, instead of blaming the recipe, blame the cook! Or at least the method of preparation crabs_meatthat made the food so unsuitable to your taste πŸ˜›

The star ingredient in this dish? Yes, it would have to be the crab, because it just ups the ante a bit on the recipe as a whole. And crab meat is subtly tasty. I love how red the flesh turns when it’s cooked πŸ™‚ All I can say is, it will not be another 6 months before I have crab again! And these are always such imposing little critters when you see them scuttling across the beach! I try not to think of Sebastian from The Little Mermaid as I visualize the rosy crustaceans simmering in a garlicky broth πŸ™‚ So many possibilities with crab too! Like: crab tacos, maybe? Crab lasagna πŸ™‚ or crab on toast, brilliant!

Fresh Mint & Peppered Pasta with Buttered Artichokes, Parmesan, and Crab

Ingredients

(for pasta)Artichoke_Botanicals

1 package fettuccine or linguine

water

sea salt

(for sauce)

8 oz frozen crab meat, defrosted & de-shelled

1 block of Parmesan (or other aged cheese), grated

1 bunch of fresh mint, minced

1 can artichoke hearts, drained & chopped

1 cup dry white wine

cracked black pepper

5 Tbs. butter

1/4 cup olive oil

(1) Fill a large pot with salted water, cover, and bring to a boil over high heat. While the pasta water readies, heat the olive oil over medium heat in a skillet. (2) Add 1 cup of water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and let the mixture thicken, about 5 minutes. (3) Add butter, white wine, and crab meat. Bring the heat to medium and simmer, covered until the crab meat is cooked, 3-4 minutes. (4) Lower the heat to low. Add artichoke, fresh mint, and 1/3 of the grated cheese, stirring until just combined. (5) Remove from heat. Season to taste with salt & pepper. crab_posterServe hot garnished with extra grated cheese, fresh mint sprigs , & cracked pepper if desired.

Serves 4

Mmm…briny, savory, herby richness (is there enough adverbs there? ;)) doesn’t seem to get old. What to make next? Watch out salty crustaceans, I’m just beginning…

My question: what is your favorite pasta dish involving seafood?

I’m wondering what the consensus is…

3.25.13

Shrimp Saganaki (!)

Almost called this post “ode to Greek food” but it is perhaps a better ode to cheese πŸ™‚ Maybe there’s something about the dead of winter that makes you crave richly flavorful (and wonderfully filling) dishes. It’s been a while since I had shrimp and I have Greece_posterno excuse; it’s really the cutest, tastiest little crustacean I’ve ever had. The best part of this dish in particular is what I’d like to call its “Greekness,” which translates into how simple it is by nature – with basic ingredients, easy preparation & cooking, and even simpler cleanup since you’re all eating out of the skillet. What more could you ask for from bread and cheese?

My star ingredient would have to be the feta cheese. This dish would have been damn boring without it. And while ouzo, tomatoes, herbs, and shrimp all make for a layered entente flavor-wise, the cheese is always the best part. I mean, isn’t it? There’s something special about melted cheese too, feta is no exception. Like all components of Greek food, feta goes well with garlic. Coincidence? I think not! More like culinary fate, but that does sound a bit intense πŸ˜‰ The Greeks knew a thing or two about good food back in the day, as they still do, just look at their contributions to cooking and awesome food-eating as we know it today – wine, yogurt, olive oil, vinegar – what would we be eating today without them?

I made this for some fellow foodies last week and it was well worth all the chopping and sautΓ©ing (which really wasn’t much). I was initially worried it wouldn’t feed us all, but cheese always satisfies πŸ™‚ if not, garlic bread definitely helps! This dish, like shrimp in general, goes great with a (chilled) white wine. I am not a huge fan of chardonnay but with shrimp it’s like bread and butter πŸ˜€

This recipe comes from July’s Bon Appetit. I don’t know why I hesitated to make it way back when in July (oh yes, maybe the newborn baby was a mild deterrent;) but I got rather inspired with a new kitchen and all, along with a whole new host of super markets to forage through for “Greek” ingredients. Call it the spice of life, variety just makesFeta_cheese a chef want to show off πŸ˜‰ Like the recipe subtext says, high-quality ingredients make this recipe, so don’t skimp on the good stuff – I used a nice ouzo, marinated shrimp, and the most solid chunk of feta I could find πŸ™‚ Everything in this dish comes together pretty fast so remember to put the bread in the oven!

I did add one flaming embellishment to this recipe – which is probably the one reason I like saganaki in the first place! In theΒ  authentic Greek version of this recipe, the cheese is doused in ouzo and set aflame, effectively melting the cheese and looking seriously cool in the process. Did I light my skillet of cheese on fire with ouzo? Yes, without hesitation too πŸ˜€ (okay, only a few seconds of hesitation though..) and I can tell you, it was awesomely non-dangerous and was only really alit for about 7 seconds, although completely covered in a purple flames that whole time…This just makes me want to flambe all sorts of others things with ouzo too πŸ˜‰

Shrimp Saganaki with Fresh Herbs, Feta Cheese, and Tomatoes

Ingredients

1/2 kg. medium-sized shrimp, peeled & deveinedshrimp-medium

4 oz. block feta

3 small loaves garlic bread (frozen or fresh)

1 bunch green onions, chopped

8 garlic cloves, chopped

1 can chopped tomatoes, drained

1/2 cup white wine

3 Tbs. ouzo (anise-flavored liquor)

1/2 cup vegetable broth

1/2 cup chopped fresh dillFIRE

1/2 cup chopped fresh basil

1 Tbs. dried oregano

olive oil

sea salt & cracked pepper

(1) Heat 3 Tbs. olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. When hot, add green onions and garlic, stirring often until softened, about 3 minutes. (2) Add tomatoes and stir occasionally until reduced by half, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat. (3) Add wine, dried oregano, ouzo, and broth to the skillet and return to heat on medium-high. Let boil until reduced by half, another 5 minutes, and season to taste with salt and pepper. (4) Combine the fresh herbs in a cup, stirring half into the skillet mixture and reserving the remaining half of the herbs for serving. (5) Reduce heat to medium, and add shrimp, laying them on the side, leaving some space in the middle. Put the block of feta in the center of the skillet and cover, cooking until the cheese is soft and shrimp are cooked through, 5-6 minutes. (6) Warm the garlic bread in the oven and slice. When done, place in a glass bowl and cover. (7) When the shrimp & cheese are looking ready, pour a shot of ouzo over the top of the feta. Safely, light the ouzo on fire and let cook until flames extinguish themselves, about 10 seconds. (8) When ready to serve, remove skillet from heat. Put on the table with a wooden cutting board beneath (to protect the table:). Garnish the skillet mixture with the rest of the fresh herbs and cracked pepper. Serve hot with small plates and garlic bread. Goes with white wine, chilled beer, and/or more ouzo with lemon slices πŸ™‚

Serves 4

Shrimp-and-tomatoGod bless Greek flavors! I’ll have to go there someday, especially if I ever want to see the sun again πŸ˜‰ In the meantime I’m going to cook more creatures of the sea! They’re just so…tasty.. πŸ˜€

My question: What, in your opinion, is the tastiest appetizer involving seafood?

Maybe to truly answer this question, I’ll need to throw a little cocktail party where we serve 5 or 6 seafood appetizers and poll the guests to see which dish goes best with very dry martinis πŸ™‚ Mmm…

2.24.13

Mustardy Goodness

Hello againΒ  – so Summer came and went, didn’t it? And wow, so did Autumn! Now it’s just cold. Brrrr.. 😦 I’m on to thicker, richer flavors – as long as the food is hot!! As Thanksgiving looms in a land far away from me I keep finding excuses to make turkey breast, stuffing-like side dishes, and harvest veggies like squash and hard greens.

Panzanella is defined as “bread salad” but that is a rather colorless description of this Italian concept. The version I made of this classic can be found in August’s Bon Appetit and is traditional and still oh so simple. Panzanella is an ingenious way of using stale bread, which I end up with often enough these days for this be very useful πŸ™‚ I thought the massive amount of savory, briny flavors added another dimension of flavor to this dish, resulting in what should be called “Italian stuffing” – and good enough to substitute for the thick stuff at the Thanksgiving table. As for the mustard, the recipes are pretty consistent: mustard seeds + vinegar = mustard, or something like that. When I made my first batch, one taste just about burned my tongue off so I ended up diluting here and seasoning there considerably. Be warned, mustard means business πŸ˜‰ I decided to combine all my favorite types of mustard into one honey-beer mustard recipe that is sweet and spicy to boot. I think the result is much more fun than the standard recipe and worth the effort. After all, mustard goes in everything (and anything) you can think of, so spice it up! Add a dollop to vinaigrettes, pasta sauce, cheese platters, or scrambled eggs..

So yes, the star ingredient here is mustard. Its uses are endless and it adds ample taste in small amounts; oh, and did I mention it lasts 7 months (at least) in the fridge?! No there’s something useful. Mustard is also a host to health benefits based on the fact that mustard is mostly made up of mustard seeds and those seeds are full of potassium, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorous, among other things.. Have you seen a mustard tree? It’s huge. And a mustard seed? So small, itsy bitsy. It’s crazy that one turns into the other in a matter of years. So my motto this month is – eat more mustard! And you’d be surprised how easy that is πŸ˜€

Warm Tomato Panzanella with Capers, Olives, and Roasted Peppers

Ingredients

(for the mix)

1 whole-wheat baguette (can sub with any bread), slightly stale & broken into chunks

5 tomatoes

2 stalks of celery, thinly sliced

2 bell peppers, any color

10 kalamata olives, pitted & coarsely chopped

2 Tbs. capers, coarsely chopped

(for the dressing)

3 garlic cloves, minced

2 Tbs. sherry vinegar

3 Tbs. olive oil

2 Tbs. white wine

1 lemon, juiced

1 Tbs. spicy or whole-grain mustard

1 Tsp. chili flakes

1 Tbs. dried (or 3 Tbs. fresh) oregano

sea salt & cracked pepper

(1) Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius (350 degrees Fahrenheit). Fill a large pot with salted water and bring to a boil on high heat. Line a baking pan with foil and spray with oil, add the peppers and season with salt and pepper, mixing to coat. (2) When the oven is hot, put the baking pan on the highest rack. Roast until peppers are soft and the outside skin is blackened and blistered, 30-40 minutes. (3) Cut an ‘x’ into the skin on the bottom of each tomato with a paring knife. When the water is boiling, add the tomatoes and boil for 1 minute or so until the skin starts to peel back. Immediately transfer tomatoes to a bowl of cold water. When cool, peel the skin and coarsely chop. (4) When the peppers are done roasting, seal in a plastic bag and let sit 15 minutes. Peel and discard the blackened skins and coarse chop peppers; set aside. (5) In a large bowl, add the bread, tomatoes, roasted peppers, olives, celery, and capers. (6) Make the dressing by whisking together the mustard, olive oil, oregano, garlic, lemon juice, chili flakes, white wine, and vinegar. (7) When ready to serve, add dressing to the bread and vegetable mix, tossing to coat. Season with salt and pepper.

Serves 4

Honey Whole-Grain Beer Mustard

Ingredients

1/2 bag/jar of yellow mustard seeds

1/2 bag/jar of brown mustard seeds

1/2 bag/jar of mustard powder

1 Ceres classic beer (sub any amber beer)

1/2 cup malt vinegar

1/2 cup tepid water

1/4 cup yogurt

5 Tbs. honey

salt & cracked pepper

(1) Combine mustard seeds, powder, and beer in a large container. Mix, cover, and refrigerate overnight. (2) Add vinegar & water to the mustard seed mixture and blend until most (but not all) of the seeds are pureed. (3) Add remaining ingredients, mix well, and taste. Season with salt, cracked pepper, and more honey πŸ™‚ (3) Chill in the fridge 1-2 hours before using. Keeps in the fridge 7 months. Goes well with crackers, meat, and on rolls with pickled veggies or cheese.

So.. while being a bit time-consuming, it is possible to make your own condiments and once you’ve done so, you can use heaping spoonfuls of it in other dishes. As the sun begins to set earlier, the frost starts to cling to the corners of the windows – I’ll have to come up with even warmer, more comforting food to subsist upon πŸ˜› Ah, it’s wintertime again!

My question:

what is your favorite type of mustard?

There are quite a few variations. My favorite is a toss up between french mustard (always a classic) and honey mustard.

Seriously, who needs ketchup? πŸ˜‰

11.21.12

Herbivorous HΓΈstfest

In Danish, hΓΈstfest literally means “harvest party” which is the perfect word for this season with Fall having made an entrance and the air already a bit chillier. As a species that was probably once accustomed to hibernation :D, like most mammals, I suppose an increased appetite can be expected. As for me, the sooner it gets colder I’m craving more filling meals. I’ve always loved eating meat, probably because I am a carnivore by nature πŸ™‚ but after some reflection, I’ve noticed that most of my posts have meat in them. Having noticed this perhaps natural popularity of meat dishes, it’s true that vegetarian food is just as good and often healthier, so I decided to devote this post to vegetarian food everywhere. Here are three of my latest recipes that happen to be completely meat-free.

The melon-cucumber salad is a recipe idea of mine, including the honey mustard vinaigrette, which turned out to be the best part πŸ™‚ The roasted tomato and pepper soup recipe is from the legendary Soup Bible (which can be found on Amazon) and is full of brilliant, if not slightly time-consuming, soup ideas πŸ˜‰ The bulgur recipe is also a creation of mine and makes use of pretty much exactly what was left in our fridge and cupboards after a week or so of kitchen chaos. The fruity/peppery and honey/salty combinations of flavors seemed to get better after every bite, or maybe that was just me πŸ™‚

The star ingredient in all of these recipes is the miso, which I was finally able to procure at the Chinese grocer. Miso is basically fermented soybeans and as unappetizing as that may sound, it comes in a few different colors and has a pleasant salty taste. It’s a Japanese staple that is full of protein and high in vitamins and minerals. I was able to do some experimentation with the saltish stuff, which helps when you have a chunk since they only sell it in bulk πŸ˜€ I think it adds a rich and almost roasted flavor to all sorts of things, including dressings. If you can’t find miso, no worries there, just season as wisely as you wish with salt.

Roasted Pepper & Tomato Soup with Tortellini

Ingredients

8 – 10 tomatoes, on the vine

3 bell peppers, any color

3 sweet peppers, any color

1 Thai chili

3 yellow onions

4 cups vegetable broth

1 box of dried tortellini (with cheese and/or veggie filling)

1 tsp. sugar

1 Tbs. garlic powder

1 Tbs. red or yellow miso (optional)

sea salt & cracked pepper

sunflower oil

(1) Preheat the oven to 230 degrees Celsius (or 450 Fahrenheit). Line a large oven pan with baking paper. Half the onions, tomatoes, and all of the peppers, removing the seeds from the peppers (but not the tomatoes!) (2) Add 2 Tbs. of oil to the pan and then all of the halved veggies, stirring to coat. (3) When the oven is preheated, put the pan on the top rack and let roast until the skins of the peppers have browned and are beginning to peel, about 40-50 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool. (4) In a large pot, stir together the sugar, miso, garlic powder, and broth, warming over medium heat. (5) Remove the peels from the onions and the browned skins from the peppers (it’s okay to leave the tomato skins on). Using a blender, puree the roasted vegetables before adding to the soup pot. (6) Bring the soup to a boil and add tortellini, cooking until pasta is al dente, 10-15 minutes. Serve topped with a dollop of creme fraiche, dried herbs, or scrambled eggs πŸ™‚

Serves 6

Spiced Bulgur with Mango, Miso & PickledΒ  Ginger

Ingredients

(for bulgur)

2 cups bulgur wheat (coarse or finely ground)

4 cups onion (or vegetable) broth

1/2 cup pickled ginger, chopped

1/2 cucumber, peeled & chopped

1 bunch green onions, finely chopped

1/2 cup dried green mango, chopped

1 green bell pepper, seeded & sliced

1 red bell pepper, seeded & sliced

(for dressing)

3 Tbs. yellow miso

2 Tbs. rice vinegar

2 Tbs. olive oil

2 Tbs. apricot jam (or other jam)

3 Tbs. lemon juice

2 – 3 dried chilies (like Pequin or African Bird’s Eye), crushed

1 Tbs. brown sugar

1 Tbs. soy sauce

1 tsp. garlic powder

salt & cracked pepper

(1) Cook bulgur uncovered in salted broth according to package instructions; this usually involves 1 part bulgur to 2 parts broth, for 10-14 minutes or until all liquid has been absorbed. Fluff with fork. (2) In a small bowl, mix together all the ingredients for the dressing, miso through garlic powder and stir well; set aside. (3) Next add all of the peppers, green onions, mango, cucumber, and ginger to the bulgur and mix. (4) When ready to serve, add the dressing and stir until blended. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Can be served warm or cold.

Serves 4

Melon-Cucumber SaladΒ  with Honey Mustard Vinaigrette

Ingredients

(for salad)

1 small honeydew melon, skinned, seeded & cut into chunks

1 cucumber, cut into chunks

6 cups mixed greens (like baby spinach, arugula, & red-leaf)

4 sweet peppers, seeded & thinly sliced

1 red onion, peeled & thinly sliced

(for vinaigrette)

1/4 cup white wine

1/4 cup olive oil

1 garlic clove, minced

1 Tbs. paprika

1 Tbs. yellow miso

3 Tbs. honey

3 Tbs. Dijon mustard

2 Tbs. milk (or cream)

1/2 Tbs. mustard seeds

1/2 Tbs. onion powder

1/2 Tbs. ground black pepper

1 lemon, juiced

(1) Make sure all the greens are washed and dried before tossing with the peppers, onion, melon, and cucumber. Cover and chill until ready to serve. (2) To make the honey mustard, combine all of the ingredients – white wine through lemon juice- in a sealable jar or tupperwareΒ and shake until blended. Can be kept chilled in the fridge for up to 2 months πŸ™‚ (3) When ready to eat, toss the salad again with the dressing and serve immediately.

Serves 4

So those are my offerings to the harvest gods and vegetarians everywhere πŸ™‚

It’s amazing how the earth just grows all sorts of differently delicious plants and countless other things for us to eat. I think being human has never been better πŸ˜›

My question:

What is your favorite vegetarian dish to eat?

10.8.12

Sugar, Spice and Everything Nice

Hooray! Spring is here and so is the new baby πŸ™‚ He’s so beautiful it’s hard to imagine I’ll be able to cook anything when I’m not fondly staring at him πŸ˜‰ Anyways, I decided that in order to tie my latest kitchen creations in with what’s left of Springtime and the whole ‘sweet’ theme I’ve been experiencing lately, I would post a couple of recipes reflective of this celebratory mood.

Below I’ve listed 2 jam recipes – both using the same base (strawberries) but with 2 very different takes on this delicious Spring fruit πŸ˜€ Since making jam is so incredible easy (not to mention pretty entertaining), I’m sharing 2 recipes I made up myself, concocted in the last weeks leading up to the big arrival.

The star ingredient in both recipes is (surprise!) strawberries. Admittedly, these berries are some of the best for jam – colorful and sweet – they just scream “eat me!” every time I see them but hey, maybe that’s just me πŸ™‚ The first of these recipes is a spicy jam version which, although it may sound a little strange initially, is absolutely delicious; I spread it on crusty bread, mix it in with plain yogurt for breakfast, and serve it alongside slices of cheese as a snack. Either way, the ‘spice’ element shouldn’t scare anyone away because a tamer version can be made by simply omitting the seeds in the peppers. The second recipe included in this post is a sweet on slightly tart combination with strawberry and rhubarb, an earthier recipe with a syrupy sweet finish. For all those who consider a little jam now and then among the finer things in life, enjoy! πŸ˜€

Strawberry-Chile Jam with Cognac

Ingredients

1 bag frozen strawberries, thawed

3 Thai chilies (or other hot red chile)

3 cups sugar

2 Tbs. pectin (or citronsyre) powder

1/2 cup cognac

1/2 lemon

(1) Chop or blend the strawberries so they’re in coarse pieces; dice the chilies but do not seed them (if you’d like your jam less spicy, then go ahead and seed them). (2) Mix the strawberries, sugar, chilies, and 1/2 cup water in a medium saucepan. Cook until bubbling over medium-high heat until water burns off, about 8-10 minutes. (3) Add the cognac and pectin, stirring often, another 5-8 minutes until jam has thickened and coats the side of a spoon. (4) Juice the lemon into the jam and cook another 2 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool. (5) Spoon the jam into glass containers and let come to room temperature before refrigerating. Serve with anything from bread, meat, cheese, yogurt, scones, or ice cream πŸ™‚ Keeps chilled in the fridge over 3 weeks.

Serves 6

White Wine Strawberry-Rhubarb Jam

Ingredients

1 bag frozen strawberries, thawed

3 rhubarb stalks, coarsely chopped

3 cups sugar

2 Tbs. pectin powder

1 cup white wine

(1) Heat the strawberries, sugar, rhubarb, and 1/2 cup water in a saucepan over medium-high heat until boiling; cook until water burns off and sugar dissolves, about 8-10 minutes. (2) Transfer to a blender and pulse until smooth, return to saucepan and reheat, adding the white wine and pectin. (3) Cook another 8-10 minutes until jam has thickened and coats the side of a spoon. (4) Remove the jam from heat and let cool. Spoon into glass containers and let come to room temperature before refrigerating. Serve with crackers, cheese, on toast, or with chilled cream for dessert πŸ™‚ Keeps in the fridge over 3 weeks.

Serves 6

So this has been my experience with jam-making of late and seriously – god bless berries…jam would simply not be the same without them πŸ™‚

My question:

what fruit & wine combination works great for jam?

The next venture in preserves I’ll be undertaking will be blueberry-grappa jelly, from a recipe I found in Cucina La Italiana, which sounds ridiculously delici0us and sweet, but we’ll have to see..

5.19.12

Red, Rich, Delicious Soup

The colors of Spring are very inspiring at times. In addition to all the wonderfully vibrant flowers popping up in every neglected patch of grass, even the vegetable section at the grocery store seems suddenly brighter these days. The colors appealing to me lately are all the brilliantly rich ones — red, purple, orange — which is what led to the decision to serve up my most recent decoction of red peppers, sweet potatoes, and red onions. Throw it all in a pot, cook for about an hour, blend to smoothness, and you arrive at a conglomerate of flavors. I often forget how wonderful soup is until I make it again, so tasty, healthy, and easy while existing on a comfort level to humans everywhere. Imagine, we’re eating and rehydrating at the same time πŸ˜€

This recipe is from one of my favorite cookbooks, appropriately titled the Soup Bible, and is amazingly simple to make and equally delicious to eat (I feel like I use that word a lot)…I may have embellished the original version a bit for reasons of my own creativity (that, and two garlic cloves is never enough). Admittedly, this is a short post as my energy wavers these days in the weeks before I bring this little human into the world, but short is sweet as they say, and the great thing about soup is that it cooks itself, all you need is the right combination of vegetables to begin with (and there are marvelously numerous options to choose from). What results with this blended recipe is a delightfully red soup that has a fresh, peppery initial taste with a round, rich aftertaste.

The star ingredient at work in this soup is the sweet potatoes. I wouldn’t have originally thought they’d be so contributive in flavor, but these ugly-skinned tuberous roots are not only full of nutrition, they add a unique taste to any dish they’re utilized in. Taking the time to peel them in the beginning was tiresome (not to mention messy..) but starting out with vegetables in their raw state is probably the best way to go about making any meal. Another reason they’re the star ingredient is because sweet potatoes are so cheap πŸ™‚ Granted, don’t confuse them with yams (labeled similarly in the States), which aren’t in the same family and are often much starchier. I’m going to try and make use of these rooty relatives of the potato, as there’s a reason they’re considered kitchen staples!

Sweet & Savory Red Pepper-Sweet Potato Soup

Ingredients

5 red bell peppers, seeded & coarsely chopped

5 sweet potatoes, peeled & cubed

2 red onions, coarsely chopped

4 garlic cloves, minced

1 cup white wine

6 cups chicken broth

1 cup milk

salt & cracked pepper

(1) Put all of the sweet potatoes, red onion, bell pepper, and garlic into a large pot. Pour in the white wine and broth until veggies are covered, adding more wine if not. Bring the pot to a boil over medium-high heat. (2) Once boiling, lower the heat, cover, and simmer for 1 hour until veggies are soft and the sweet potato begins to fall apart. (3) Remove from heat and let cool 10 minutes. Using a hand-held blender, puree the soup in the pot until smooth. (4) Stir in the milk and season the soup to taste with salt and plenty of cracked pepper. If desired, serve with toasted bread and/or grated cheese.

Serves 6

So that was my brief excursion into the comforting red and rich flavors of making soup. I froze a portion of this deliciousness for later and I have the sneaking suspicion that just sitting around may make it even more tasty than it already is.

For now, while I can still move with (slow) relative ease, I’ll be cooking more fresh and flavorsome food in attempts to fatten this baby up in the meantime. Ahhh….what a task πŸ˜€

My question: What is your favorite red vegetable based on taste?

4.16.12

Spicy Asian Flavors

The new semester is in full swing and amid all the ruckus of studying, reading, and working – I find myself with basically one evening a week free to cook, and that is Sunday. Well, it seemed like a great excuse for a little sophistication last weekend so I chose a supper menu that was Asian-inspired and had plenty of spice, salt, greens, and all that other good stuff. Also since I am feeling just a little sick, (I know, it’s just unfair..) I thought it would be best to cook something with strong flavors that would clear the sinuses and settle heavily in my ever-expanding belly πŸ˜‰ The wilted greens though, turned out to be the best idea and had lots of vitamin C to increase those white cells and boost what’s left of my immune system, with plenty of Calcium for baby who will take it from my bones if he doesn’t get enough – ahhh!

The recipes I reference here originally came from two different sources, with the meat recipe (which originally called for pork) from the September edition of Bon Appetit and the cooked greens recipe from last December’s Food & Wine. Of course I had to implement some changes here and there in both recipes since the bazaar I shop at doesn’t stock pork (anywhere I guess, bummer..) and the veggies took quite the search just to find an acceptable substitute for collard greens. While the task of shopping, chopping, and preparing it all seemed a bit daunting at first, I’m glad I made the effort because in the end — while consuming it at a rapid rate — I had to admit how tastefully worth it the meal turned out to be πŸ˜€

The star ingredient in this spicy Asian menu is garlic. Typical, right? …And I’m sure I’ve used this ingredient somewhere before πŸ˜‰ The fact of the matter is I used garlic in various forms throughout the preparation of this meal, with minced garlic in the greens, garlic sriracha sauce in the marinade, and some of the same savory spiciness reserved for serving with the seared meat (now that’s alliteration:-) Garlic has its own host of immune-benefiting properties by boosting antibody production, but I’ve elaborated on this topic before so I’ll stop there.. Either way, it is an incredibly flavorful ingredient/medicine/vegetable which ranks it among the best of (cheap) kitchen staples. I find myself with plenty of fresh garlic these days and was happy to use some of it (okay, a lot of it) in our evening meal.

Spicy Marinated Beef Shoulder with Curried White Rice

Ingredients

1 lb (or 1/2 kg) beef shoulder

olive oil, for cooking

(for the marinade/sauce)

1/2 cup sake or white wine

1/4 cup fish sauce

1/4 cup rice vinegar

1/4 cup lemon juice

3 Tbs. olive oil

6 Tbs. garlic sriracha sauce (or regular sriracha, plus 5 cloves of minced garlic)

(for the rice)

2 packets (or 2 cups) white rice

1 Tbs. curry powder

1 Tbs. ground Coriander

1 Tbs. rice vinegar

salt & pepper

(1) Combine all ingredients for the marinade (white wine/sake through sriracha) in a medium bowl and whisk until blended. Reserve 1/2 cup of this sauce for serving. (2) Wash the beef shoulder and pat dry, trim excess fat, and cut the shoulder into 1/2 inch (or 1/3 cm) thick slices. Put all the beef pieces in the marinade, turn to coat, and let marinate at room temperature 35-45 minutes. (3) Meanwhile, heat salted water in a saucepan over medium-high heat (according to package instructions) and add rice when boiling; lower the heat and simmer until soft and most of the liquid is absorbed, 15-20 minutes typically. When cooked, drain the rice and rinse with warm water. Stir in curry, coriander, and vinegar, mixing well. Cover the rice and set aside until ready to serve. (4) After the meat has marinated, heat 1 Tbs. of olive oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. When hot, add the beef pieces, shaking off excess marinade. Sear each side, turning once, until meat is cooked to medium, and browned on the outside, 4-5 minutes. If the beef gives off too much liquid while searing, stir excess into the rice. (5) Let the meat sit covered for 5 minutes before serving over rice with a side of the reserved sauce.

Serves 4

Cumin-Braised Kale with Onions & Garlic

Ingredients

6 Tbs. olive oil

1 large yellow onion, halved & thinly sliced

5 garlic cloves, minced

2 Tbs. ground cumin

1 tsp. crushed red pepper

1 bunch kale (or collard greens substitute)

1/2 cup chicken broth

1 Tbs. butter

salt & pepper

(1) Wash the greens thoroughly and remove stems, cutting off any browned or wilted pieces. Slice into thin ribbons. (2) In a large wok or skillet, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add onion, garlic, cumin, and red pepper and fry until onions are soft, about 5 minutes. (3) Next, add all of the chopped greens and cook, stirring constantly, until wilted, another 3-4 minutes. (4) Stir in the chicken broth, cover and let everything cook until greens are tender and the liquid is gone, 5-6 minutes more. Remove from heat, salt generously, and stir in a Tablespoon of butter. Serve immediately.

Serves 4

So more of my meddling in Asian cooking has proven (yet again) worthwhile, producing minimum leftovers which I try to take as a good sign. Valentine’s day came and went and instead of planning another huge meal, I opted for a series of snacks–papaya, feta cheese, cherries, garlic sausage, and dark chocolate–ahh, I’m all about ease during the week. We’ll have to see what cooking madness may develop this weekend when I finally find myself with a little more freetime }:-)

My question: What is your favorite green to eat cooked (that is, slightly wilted)…and why?

Is it because it’s salty, or healthy–or both? I used to hate the stuff, not so much anymore!

2.16.12